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Here is the 2nd article in the series “The Impact of Technology on Childhood Development.” If you missed the first article, it covered the Hidden Hazards of Blue Light and Digital Devices on Kids Eyes.

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My friend’s three and a half year old was showing signs of delayed speech development. As parents, they did what any concerned parent would do and took him for their pediatrician.

I’d like to back up and give you details on which they’re experiencing.

They have a three and a half year old young boy who’s a vintage’textbook sensory seeker ‘; he simply can’t get enough of anything and is extremely delayed in his speech abilities and social skills.

He manages a product and mobile phone very well as many of his peers do.

Initially, I believed it had been incredible to view him wrap his little fingers around the family iPad or his mother’s cell phone, swiping through icons to get to a really entertaining video or “educational” game.

He taps “play” and emits a squeal of pleasure and sheer delight. After watching the video once or playing the overall game a couple of rounds, he swipes back to the key screen to open up another app where he watches an episode of a colorful animated cartoon. Halfway through, he moves onto another game, which involves animated fruits making their way in to a character’s belly.

Once they try to remove the iPad, they suffer through one heck of a fit that threatens to go nuclear; trembling lip, tears, feet kicking a floor, hands balled into fists and a high-pitched screaming session.

He seems to choose the iPad or smartphone to everything else.

Solutions when they are the only things that will keep him quiet.

He has what on top look like symptoms of autism, however the autism specialist they took him to is reluctant to have him fully evaluated until he’s 4. He could already tell that their son doesn’t exactly match with autism, and believes which will be correctly diagnosed when they wait.

Based on the reading, his parents think he might be diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), which impacts one in twenty people in the overall population and is commonly heredity.

 

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source:iopscience.iop.org

 

The origin of Sensory Processing Disorder is unknown. Preliminary research and studies suggest that SPD is often inherited.

No-one in either family has SPD, and apart from very few symptoms, he does unfit the symptomatic profile.

Another thought they’ve is he has Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS); PPD-NOS symptoms include:

• Inappropriate social behavior
• Uneven skill development (motor, sensory, visual-spatial-organizational, cognitive, social, academic, behavioral)
• Speech and language comprehension skills which are poorly developed
• Difficulty with transitions
• Nonverbal and/or verbal communication deficits
• Taste, sight, sound, smell and/or touch sensitivities are increased or decreased
• Perseverative (repetitive or ritualistic) behaviors (i.e., opening and closing doors repeatedly or switching a mild on and off).

He is extremely physically active (especially together with his constant physical exercise, running and jumping), he doesn’t follow directions well, which I attribute to insufficient discipline, but he is affectionate together with his family and relatives and makes good eye contact.

 

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source:ahajournals.org

 

He features a great appetite and eats pretty much anything put in front of him, does well in crowds and generally around others as long as he does not need to really have a direct interaction since his verbal skills and social skills, e.g. manners and similar are underdeveloped. His fine motor skills are okay, not great. He cannot hold a pencil and fists one such as a two-year-old with a crayon.

His verbal skills and social skills are underdeveloped.

He understands far significantly more than he lets on. He doesn’t imitate sounds or vocabulary much, if at all.

His parents know he is cognitively delayed, but it’s hard to find out how delayed, because of the type of kid he’s and his not enough discipline that i think, his parents haven’t invested the time in developing.

The sole word he uses consistently and appropriately is “pop,” and he excitedly points to his grandfather whenever possible. He frequently babbles, which is baby talk that includes words but not complete conversational sentences. Thus, his vocabulary is restricted and seems to be what he hears on @

@ and YouTube. He does not seem to have the idea of putting a word having an image other than what he sees in videos or’educational games.’

From all they have find out about sensory seekers, extreme speech delay doesn’t appear to be especially prevalent.

They recently had their son evaluated by an occupational therapist and a speech therapist.

Within the course of the evaluations, they were asked simply how much screen time he’s each day. They figure that he averages 45 to 60 minutes daily; from what I’ve observed I believe it higher and nearer to 90 minutes spread through the entire day.

A product / iPad / Android or smartphone has replaced a babysitter and one on one interaction. All of us lead busy lives and the few minute of a break it allows seemed to be harmless, or so they thought.

 

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source:sciencedirect.com

 

The speech therapist described to them the information from a recently available Journal of Pediatrics study “Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young children.” The study “suggests the more hours children under 2 years old spend having fun with smartphones, tablets, and other handheld screens, the much more likely they are to start talking later.”

“Based on the study, 20 percent of kids under the age of two spend about 30 minutes per day using screens, leading to a nearly 50 percent increased risk of speech delay.”

This study was completed at the Hospital for Sick Children in Canada by pediatricians who examined screen time and its effects on 900 children between 6 months and 2 yrs old.

The outcomes of the analysis demonstrated that there’s a 49% increased chance of delayed speech for every single extra 30 minutes spent employing a touchscreen, be it a product, iPad, iPhone or Android device.

Think about this for a few moments:

• 10% of US children under the age of 2 used tablets or smartphones in 2011, the one-year anniversary of the introduction of the iPad.
• By 2013, 40% of kids 2 and under had access to a tablet or smartphone.
• By 2015, 58% of children under age two had used a tablet or mobile phone.
In accordance with a Nielsen Study, more than 70 percent of children under 12 use tablets and iPads. A current Journal of Pediatrics study indicated that:
• 20% of 1-year-olds own a tablet.
• 28% of 2-year-olds could navigate a mobile device without assistance.
• 28% of parents said they work with a mobile device to place their kids to sleep.
The rate of adoption of tablets, iPads, and smartphones by kids under the age of 3 has grown more than 5x in 4 years with and the unknown impact on their cognitive development.

There is little scientific data on the effects of long-term usage of tablets, iPads, and smartphones; although studies are underway.

Optometrists are seeing a sharp increase in young kids with myopia (short-sightedness). The World Health Organization has documented that nearsightedness is growing at an alarming rate worldwide and screen use is just a well-accepted contributing factor resulting from the early introduction of handheld devices to kids.

Interactive screens such as iPads, tablets, and smartphones are recognized to disrupt sleep. The blue light emitted by the super-sharp displays prevents the release of melatonin, a significant sleep hormone, which interferes with the natural bodily rhythms, resulting in sleep disturbances in both adults and children from their use.

Blue light is damaging because oahu is the highest energy wavelength of visible light. This energy is also able to penetrate all the best way to the rear of the eye, through the eyes’natural filters, and that’s the issue. Long-term exposure causes injury to the retina.

Presently, there’s broad, in-depth research about television exposure and kids, but little in-depth, long-term research on the impact of interactive screens from smartphones, iPads and Android tablets. Studies are presently underway; however, the jury remains out.

Pediatricians and child development experts agree that while passive screen time facing a TV or an iPad or tablet for a 30-minute session of videos games or’educational’games could be entertaining, it is not going to supply a wealthy learning experience or develop fine or gross motor skills. And you will find developmental and cognitive risks.

Research has confirmed that having a movie or TV running in the background negatively affects their development when a child is engaged in play and learning. This is a distraction from the job at hand and lowers their concentration.

 

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source:theguardian.newspapers.com

 

Studies have confirmed that hours of background TV decreases child-parent interaction, which sets back a child’s language development.

This can be a big concern: if children are left with screen-based babysitters such as tablets, iPads, and smartphones, they’re not interacting with parents and siblings or the true world.

You can find only so many hours in one day, and the time allocated to screens comes at a top price, taking time away from better activates that develop fine and gross motor skills, expand their knowledge and skill sets, build social skills and expand verbal language abilities.

Kids under the age of three require a well-balanced group of activities, which range from instructed play (math worksheets/games, coloring pages, puzzles and games, arts, and crafts), time and energy to explore nature, handling and using physical toys and socializing with other siblings and peers alongside adults.

In 2016, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued guidelines on screen time were issued. Prior to this update, AAP had established that the overall screen time limit of no more than no two hours per day before the TV for kids over age 2.

The revised AAP guidelines recommend:
• One hour daily for children 2 to 5 years of age.
• Parents should monitor and set restrictions for kids 6 years of age and older.
• Under age18 months there ought to be no screen time allowed and they should not come in contact with any digital media.
o Baby’s brains, eye and speech are undergoing a rapid growth phase and development that makes them the most vulnerable to screens.

Any duration of time spent using tablets, iPads or smart phones for entertainment purposes is what the AAP defines as screen time.

As parents we need to remember that people are our children’s main role models, which means habits we have we directly and indirectly instill into our children.

We have to be very aware of our own behaviors and this means turning off our smart phones, putting down the tablet or iPad combined with the TV and laptop and being in the here and now with our kids.

Kids can tell when our heads are still on the email we just read on our phone. By not making time for them, this usually makes their behavior worse.

As parents we must establish a media spare time every single day and spend this time with our attention 100% centered on our kids and engage with them. Smart phones, iPads, Android tablets or phones are off limits at the dinner table. This is family time. The same is valid for all bedrooms. Bedrooms are intended for sleeping.

The three methods for making learning grammar interesting are:

1. Using Songs: Music always triggers the interest of the children. By singing phrases, this may become embedded into your brain a lot faster. To be able to execute this, find a song that uses several tenses or different grammar points. Have the students to sing along and then write the lyrics on the board. Cause them to sing it together and getting the tune within their head. Following this, we can quiz them the tenses used and grammatical points that are in the specific text. Allow it to be short and quick, and once they get the hang of it, let them sing again. After this, try building a game out of it. Select individual students to pick an expression on that and change the tense out of it. This might provide them with lots of practice using different tenses and verb forms, and in the light-hearted way.

2. Make it into a Game: Both adults and children love playing games. Perhaps, even making into a competition will be a much more fun. This may often motivate them to understand faster. Amongst teenagers, this can be a lot more effective whenever we divide the class into groups. Besides, everyone is likely to be alert and enjoy too.

3. Tell a tale: Another way to make grammar a little easier to know is to teach it in the form of storytelling. Get the students to create a’story stick ‘, whereby everyone contributes a line to the general finished story. If you will find any grammar mistakes, in this, then leave it until the end. When the entire story is finished and written on the board, let a student show up and make appropriate corrections in turns. Get the whole class involved and ask the students questions as to the reasons certain tenses are how they are. Having something to concentrate on keeps the student alert and allows grammatical concepts to be absorbed a whole lot easier.

The advantages of the aforementioned methods of learning grammar are they draw the attention of the students to new grammatical structures as it may be the fun way to learn. However, there’s a massive disadvantage if these strategies are employed constantly. The students may not master the grammatical rules and structures unless more practice worksheets are given. So, I think, the aforementioned approaches to learning grammar must be implemented only while initiating new grammar concepts.

Learning grammar may also be made fun and engaging in these ways such as:

(1) Using Celebrity Profiles: We can teach and practice any verb tense in a great way. Allow the students pick out a common sports star or celebrities. Find a short biography or write one on your own summarizing a celebrity’s main achievements. Read the bio together with your students and make sure they understand the differences. Contrast use of simple past and past perfect or present perfect tense.


(2) Using Celebrity Photos: Cut fully out celebrity photo pictures from magazines. Use these pictures to instruct comparative and superlatives. E.g. Shakira is more talented than Ricky Martin or Katie Holme is taller than Tom Cruise.

(3) Articles – An or an: This activity is fantastic for beginners including small children. Cut right out a set of several words that either take’an’or’an’and mix them up. For very young learners, you may use pictures too. Divide students into pairs or groups and ask them to put the words in two piles, with respect to the article. Once they have their piles ready, inquire further if they could figure out the rule themselves.

The author Yasmin M Elias is a full-time English Teacher at an International School in Mangalore, India. She’s married to Naveed Ansari and blessed with 3 sons Ebraheem Fahmy, Falah and Fouad. She can be an ardent reader, life long learner and equally loves gardening and cooking. She’s a in your free time writer who’s very passionate about writing stories, articles and soon dreams of penning a most useful seller.

Being a preschool teacher can be exciting as well as scary since you have to deal with many toddlers at any time. Nevertheless, it provides you with a chance to be with innocent children who will amaze you sometimes with their unimaginable acts. At the same time frame, they are able to cause utter chaos and make you at your tethering ends. You may even get a frustration and feel helpless at times. Though some small children get adjusted to the college surroundings in not as time, a significant percentage of kids make time to get familiar with the new environment and can often test a teacher’s patience. Even when it is difficult to regulate a lot of kids of such early age, taking the right efforts to obtain them associated with various school activities can raise their interests and avoid disruptions in the class. Listed here is a set of different activities a preschool teacher can take in his/her classroom for complete development of the child.

Keep fun games

As these students have a brief attention span, you must focus on keeping activities that are short and an easy task to understand. The children often get distracted easily, and hence one must include acts that will keep their interests and also increase their eagerness to understand what happens next. You can arrange fun games between a couple or group of students by making use of pictures or even a game which involves moving across the class to locate the prize.

Encourage participation in art corner

With art and craft activities, you can encourage the youngsters to paint their ideas and enhance creativity in them. It can benefit you know what all thoughts continue in the young mind and also learn their regions of interest. It’ll teach them the proper usage of colors, scissors, glue, etc., and understand how these specific things should be handled.

Conduct dramatic plays

Rather than verbally teaching certain concepts, try to portray them with the aid of a story. Visualizing things helps the students to know the items more effectively. You can convey the lessons by dramatizing part or the whole story along with your colleagues. Also, you can make usage of nursery songs or gestures for the same.

Include puzzles and science

The kids are always interested in learning new things and often drift off to places in the classroom when they notice something unusual. Have jigsaw puzzles in your class while they help stimulate mental performance and enhance memory in kids. In addition, it supports developing motor skills.

Motivate children to bond with others

As much children of the same generation get together in a preschool, the likelihood of conflicts between them are always high. To prevent this, a preschool teacher must encourage friendship among the kids and also urge them to share their tiffin during lunchtime or breaks. He/she must motivate the students to be involved in group games.

Utilize worksheets

While worksheets are less common in this age, you can have creative worksheets for the youngsters to simply help them develop their imagination and comprehensive skills. You can keep simple pages where the kid is expected to complement similar objects, draw images about a particular topic as well as color the printed figure.

Read out stories

Children in this kind of age group have the capability to catch more when they hear repetitive things. Try narrating the same story for a week and ask them to repeat it next time as you wait the role cards.

To make the preschool a common place, permit notes from parents or allow the kid to bring his/her favorite toy to the classroom. Also, you’ll have unique birthday celebrations. While handling the young students is not any easy task and requires lots of patience, planning innovative activities will help the youngsters enjoy and also make sure they are feel comfortable.

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